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Slutty? Think Again

There is often a misconception that people in consensually non-monogamous relationships, such as polyamory or open relationships, are at higher risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than people in monogamous relationships. However, recent studies suggest that the actual risk may be more complicated than this simple dichotomy.

One study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that people in consensually non-monogamous relationships had similar rates of STIs as people in monogamous relationships. The study surveyed over 2,000 people, and found that people in consensually non-monogamous relationships were more likely to use condoms consistently and get tested for STIs regularly than people in monogamous relationships. The study also found that communication and negotiation skills were key factors in reducing the risk of STIs in consensually non-monogamous relationships.

Another study published in the Journal of Sex Research found that people in consensually non-monogamous relationships were more likely to engage in behaviors that reduced the risk of STIs than people in monogamous relationships. The study surveyed over 800 people, and found that people in consensually non-monogamous relationships were more likely to use condoms, get tested for STIs, and discuss STI status with their partners than people in monogamous relationships.

However, it is important to note that not all consensually non-monogamous relationships are the same, and the risk of STIs can vary depending on the specific dynamics of the relationship. For example, if one partner in a consensually non-monogamous relationship engages in high-risk sexual behavior without the knowledge or consent of their other partner, this can increase the risk of STIs for everyone involved.

It is also important to note that the risk of STIs is not solely determined by the type of relationship or sexual behavior. Other factors, such as age, gender, and sexual orientation, can also affect the risk of STIs.

In conclusion, recent studies suggest that people in consensually non-monogamous relationships may have similar or lower rates of STIs than people in monogamous relationships. However, it is important to note that the risk of STIs can vary depending on the specific dynamics of the relationship and the behavior of the individuals involved. It is important for everyone, regardless of their relationship status, to engage in safe sex practices such as using condoms consistently and getting tested for STIs regularly. By promoting education and awareness about safe sex practices and encouraging open communication and negotiation skills, we can work to reduce the risk of STIs and promote healthy, consensual relationships.


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